Sallisaw Lion's Club recognized as chamber Member of the Month


Lion's Club members, from left to right, Eric Carter, Jordan Pace, Bobby Qualls, Club President Marley Abell, Treye Girdner, Steve O'Neal, Frank Sullivan III, George Bormann, Pat Kennedy and Randi Gray.


Wednesday, Sept. 22, 2021 - The Salllisaw Lion's Club was recognized Wednesday, during the September membership luncheon of the Sallisaw Chamber of Commerce, as the Member of the Month. Treye Girdner, the chamber's 2022 president-elect, welcomed the Sallisaw Lions Club and noted that The Lions Club has been a Sallisaw staple since April 19, 1938. He added that the club has lived up to its motto, “We Serve.” The Sallisaw club's 40 members have worked tirelessly to support such groups as the Boys & Girls Clubs, the Sallisaw Youth League, Catholic Charities and more.


Lions Club President Marley Abell said club members are currently working with Sallisaw High School's new ag teacher, Steven Matthews, to help get a skeet shooting program up and running. Abell said Armstrong Bank and Firstar Bank have each donated $1,000 toward the effort, and he challenged other members to donate to the cause as well. Nearly 40 students attended a recent meeting to discuss the formation of a skeet shooting team in Sallisaw, Abell said.


Oklahoma Labor Commissioner Leslie Osborn was the guest speaker at the September meeting and described her agency's role as a lot more than “union or non-union issues.”


Osborn said the Oklahoma Department of Labor deals more with workforce safety and citizen safety issues such as the inspection of rides at the various fairs and carnivals around the state each year. Oklahoma has one of the lowest injury rates at such events in the United States, she noted.


Inspections of commercial-grade hot water heaters and boilers are also key tasks for the Department of Labor and are required every two years, she said. In addition, the agency tackles commercial asbestos abatement efforts and inspects all escalators and elevators in the state once a year.


Osborn also talked about the Department of Labor's free OSHA Consultation Services program that helps private-sector Oklahoma employers understand and comply with standards from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration.


When a company requests a consultation and agrees to correct all identified hazards, a consultant will then help that company conduct industrial hygiene monitoring, suggest approaches or options for solving a safety or health problem, identify sources for further assistance, provide a written report that summarizes findings, assist with developing or maintaining an effective safety and health program, offer informal training and education for you and your employees at the workplace, evaluate injury and illness records and identify trends, assess your present safety and health management system and evaluate the physical worksite.


Benefits for those participating in the program include a reduction in workers' compensation costs, avoidance of costly OSHA inspections, elimination of costs resulting from workplace illnesses and injuries, establishment of a workplace safety plan that meets OSHA standards and provides the opportunity to obtain SHARP status exempting employers from OSHA scheduled inspections.


When you contact OSHA Consultation Services, you will receive a $1,000 tax exemption and exemption from federal OSHA inspection when using a full-service safety or health consultation.



Laura Brown, KXMX Staff Writer


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